Tagged
Environment


12:50 pm, andunie
link
How Wrong You Are

The more you know.


08:24 pm, andunie
reblogged
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The Problem With Going Green

Living high on the Prius Fallacy: Why we pretend that more benign consumption is good for the environment…

Read more

(Source: sunrec)


03:20 pm, andunie
reblogged
697,858 notes
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this urn will turn you into a tree after you die

ghoulbop24:

dr-zordersspookypvssy:

wethinkwedream:

image

and you can choose what kind of tree you want to become

image

just imagine cemeteries looking like this

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life after death

THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT I WANT

this is how all cemeteries should look. its awkward to hug a gravestone. imagine hugging your grandma/tree. ugh rebuild all cemeteries

Yeah I wanna be some sort of fruit tree so people can consume my unused life force

(Source: rainbow-road-to-happiness)


09:37 pm, andunie
reblogged
942 notes
picture
kateoplis:

Mighty Old Trees Are Perishing Fast

“It’s a worldwide problem and appears to be happening in most types of forest,” said the study’s lead author, David Lindemayer, a professor at Australian National University and an expert in landscape ecology and forest management. The research team found that big, old trees are dying at an alarmingly fast clip around the world at all latitudes – Yosemite National Park in California, the African savanna, the Brazilian rain forest, Europe and the boreal forests around the world. […]
The die-off of these 100-to-300-year-old trees raises concern, the researchers say, because they sustain biodiversity to a greater degree than many other components of the forest. “Big, old trees are not just enlarged young trees,” said Jerry F. Franklin of the University of Washington, a co-author of the study who has studied old-growth forest for 45 years. “Old trees have idiosyncratic features – a different canopy, different branch systems, a lot of cavities, thicker bark and more heartwood. They provide a lot more habitat and niches.”
Big trees also supply abundant food for numerous animals in the form of fruits, flowers, foliage and nectar, noted Bill Laurance, another co-author, from James Cook University in Australia. “Their hollows offer nests and shelter for birds and animals” and “their loss could mean extinction for such creatures,” he said. […]
The study is only the latest among many reports of how climate change and other factors are taking a severe toll on the world’s forests. British Columbia, for example, is ground zero for a giant forest die-off that is occurring across the Rockies. More than 53,000 square miles of forest there has died in the last decade. The largest previous die-off, in the 1980s, spanned 2,300 square miles. […]
A new fungal disease that is attacking Britain’s beloved ash trees has been front-page news there. It is feared that the fungus could claim more than 90 percent of Britain’s ash, as it has elsewhere in Europe.

More trees. [infographic: Michael Paukner]

kateoplis:

Mighty Old Trees Are Perishing Fast

“It’s a worldwide problem and appears to be happening in most types of forest,” said the study’s lead author, David Lindemayer, a professor at Australian National University and an expert in landscape ecology and forest management. The research team found that big, old trees are dying at an alarmingly fast clip around the world at all latitudes – Yosemite National Park in California, the African savanna, the Brazilian rain forest, Europe and the boreal forests around the world. […]

The die-off of these 100-to-300-year-old trees raises concern, the researchers say, because they sustain biodiversity to a greater degree than many other components of the forest. “Big, old trees are not just enlarged young trees,” said Jerry F. Franklin of the University of Washington, a co-author of the study who has studied old-growth forest for 45 years. “Old trees have idiosyncratic features – a different canopy, different branch systems, a lot of cavities, thicker bark and more heartwood. They provide a lot more habitat and niches.”

Big trees also supply abundant food for numerous animals in the form of fruits, flowers, foliage and nectar, noted Bill Laurance, another co-author, from James Cook University in Australia. “Their hollows offer nests and shelter for birds and animals” and “their loss could mean extinction for such creatures,” he said. […]

The study is only the latest among many reports of how climate change and other factors are taking a severe toll on the world’s forests. British Columbia, for example, is ground zero for a giant forest die-off that is occurring across the Rockies. More than 53,000 square miles of forest there has died in the last decade. The largest previous die-off, in the 1980s, spanned 2,300 square miles. […]

A new fungal disease that is attacking Britain’s beloved ash trees has been front-page news there. It is feared that the fungus could claim more than 90 percent of Britain’s ash, as it has elsewhere in Europe.

More trees. [infographic: Michael Paukner]


03:02 pm, andunie

08:40 pm, andunie
reblogged
31 notes
picture HD
uniformitarianism:

An interesting photo from USGS showing what impact severe storms can have on geomorphology. The photo shows part of the Chandeleur Islands; a north-south oriented chain of low-lying islands located approximately 100 kilometers east of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. The first image, taken in July 2001, shows narrow sandy beaches and adjacent overwash sandflats, low vegetated dunes, and backbarrier marshes broken by ponds and channels. The second image shows the same location on August 31, 2005, two days after Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Louisiana and Mississippi coastline. Storm surge and large waves from Hurricane Katrina submerged the islands, stripped sand from the beaches, and eroded large sections of the marsh. Today, few recognisable landforms are left on the Chandeleur Island chain (USGS, 2010). If you’re interested in this kind of thing, follow the link (or click the photo) and you’ll find many more photos like this, along with some interesting info!

uniformitarianism:

An interesting photo from USGS showing what impact severe storms can have on geomorphology. The photo shows part of the Chandeleur Islands; a north-south oriented chain of low-lying islands located approximately 100 kilometers east of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. The first image, taken in July 2001, shows narrow sandy beaches and adjacent overwash sandflats, low vegetated dunes, and backbarrier marshes broken by ponds and channels. The second image shows the same location on August 31, 2005, two days after Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Louisiana and Mississippi coastline. Storm surge and large waves from Hurricane Katrina submerged the islands, stripped sand from the beaches, and eroded large sections of the marsh. Today, few recognisable landforms are left on the Chandeleur Island chain (USGS, 2010). If you’re interested in this kind of thing, follow the link (or click the photo) and you’ll find many more photos like this, along with some interesting info!


01:57 am, andunie
reblogged
148 notes
picture HD
allcreatures:

Photo by Randy Harris for The New York Times
In Ohio, Eddie Miller and two of his Jacob sheep, Panda and Nerd, walk to their truck after a mowing job. Customers pay $1 per sheep per day.
(via Sheep Lawn Mowers, and Other Go-Getters - NYTimes.com)

I’ve always wondered why this wasn’t a thing.

allcreatures:

Photo by Randy Harris for The New York Times

In Ohio, Eddie Miller and two of his Jacob sheep, Panda and Nerd, walk to their truck after a mowing job. Customers pay $1 per sheep per day.

(via Sheep Lawn Mowers, and Other Go-Getters - NYTimes.com)

I’ve always wondered why this wasn’t a thing.